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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
has in the wars in afghanistan and iraq, managing the thorny pakistan relationship and preparing the united states for a leaner future. we started with afghanistan. with bin laden dead and relations with pakistan fraying. americans, including those who served in afghani, are saying that the mission is unduable the best course is to withdrawal as soon as possible. i asked the chief if the mission is still achievable. >> a critical part of the world. as we focus on this, it has been a focus on both afghanistan and pakistan and the region. as you said, bin laden is dead and had a huge impact on al- qaeda, but it did not eliminate al-qaeda. their leadership still lives there, and they threaten to plot and kill as many americans as they possibly can. we need to continue the press on al-qaeda and defeat them. strategically defeat them. that can only be done there. secondly, we are, with respect to afghanistan, we are working our way through a long-term strategic agreement right now, which, to which afghanistan president hamid karzai has indicated strong support. all of that is tied to
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
000 millions of dollars in aid to pakistan unless that country can prove that it is pursuing terrorists, among other conditions. nemany in congress have questioned pakistan's cooperation with the united states in light of the situation that killed osama bin laden. he molly henneberg live in washington. the bill puts conditions on pakistan. what are they? >> it would require pakistan to prove and the u.s. secretary of state to confirm that the pakistanis are genuinely helping out in tracking down terrorists and helping out in the investigation into how bin laden was able to hide out there for so many years. the gop chair woman says the restrictions are necessary to make sure pakistan uses u.s. aid "in the right way"? if they want to receive u.s. dollar there's is no longary blank check. no longer business as usual. they have to respond to our questions and cooperate and share information or the buck stops here. >> the bill also would put conditions on aid to egypt, lebanon, yemen and palestinian authority. although it does include a provision to allow the president to waive th
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
it to pakistan? a secret letter that might hold some clues is in the hands of a washington reporter. >>> a court hearing this howard for jared loughner. his doctors say he's dangerous even behind bars. >>> in bring, the popular "news of the world" is done after this sunday, but the investigation is not over, and journalists aren't the only target of investigators. you're in "the situation room." >>> a lot of hard bargaining ahead as the president and congressional leaders try to hammer out a deal on raising the federal debt limit as the august 2nd deadline looms, most parties are firming up their bottom lines. joining me now is senator tom coburn from oklahoma. senator, i know that you have today pentagon with speaker boehner about the republican position, or at least his position going into these debt talks. what can you tell me about where you are now when it comes to the revenue side of this equation? >> well, i think speaker boehner related that everything is on the table. i think it should be. i think that's the only way we solve this problem for our country, so i think it will be a compone
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
panetta went to iraq and afghanistan. he did not go to pakistan. i take that as a strong message. it is easy when you're in that region to attack on an extra couple of days for an important ally. i think that cross the minds of everyone who planned the trip. it was clearly a conscious decision not to go to pakistan. i think that is in part because when osama bin laden was killed on may 2 there was a list of things that we would ask the pakistan's to do, the pakistani to do, and i have not acted on any of them. this administration also put a hold on a $10 million in assistance. a great way to resolve that is sending the defense secretary to talk to folks about what is going on, but he did not. you are seeing already how differently the pentagon will treat allies in the region. "the in this morning's financial times" they had this headline -- guest: the withdrawal deadline is aggressive. they're talking about getting half of the troops out during the prime fighting season. they do not fight as much during the wintertime. we are starting to withdraw troops during a tumultuous situat
. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, every few days this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic, they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are finally beginning an attack from all sides. >> fire. >> command hustle up, grab it and get ready. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming for taliban dark into the hills but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> fire. >> go, go, go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. >> grab the round. as soon as they go, drop it. >> reporter: the bullets are too close. >> never mind. >> reporter: locals scatter, just before huge american firepower has the last word. >> they just fired it. >> oh! >> reporter: four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban falls silent. america knew why it came here but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get a police call for brass cigarette butts? >>. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop in to strafe the hills. a s
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
of the israeli-pakistan commitment. an overhaul of the flood insurance program. live house coverage here at 2:00 here on c-span. >> this weekend on book tv on c-span2 is everything you know about the yoke corral wrong? jeff given tells a different story about wyatt erp and the gang. charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the international state system. also in manana forever, jose castaneda talks about the problems facing our southern neighbor. and sign up for booktv alert, weekend schedules in your inbox. >> earlier today the number two command for the after gap stan said president obama's troop withdrawal plan doesn't pose significant risk to the counterinsurgency strategy. lieutenant counselor david rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
was the worst since the siege on the hub in 2008. officials blame pakistan-based militants but, so far, no group has claimed responsibility for yesterday's bloody strike and members of an islamic militant organization have been questioned. in another deadly attack in afghanistan, coming in the middle of a memorial service for the president's half brother who was assassinated this week. we're told a suicide bomber hit explosives in histor -- if his turban. the service was for karzai's brother who assassination leaves a major power vacuum in kandahar as civilian deaths in afghanistan jumped 15 percent so far this year. two men raped his daughter and wife and murdered his entire family and set the house ablaze and now attorneys for a suspect charged in the case say that they do not want the doctor in the courtroom for the trail because he is not a victim. our legal panel is back now with a look at both sides of the argument in a moment. es that in. new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. you know that comes with a priva
in somalia. in addition to the war in pakistan and libya and iraq and yemen, now the secret ops branch of the military is launching kind of secret drone strikes somalia. what's secret, disclosed, military, intelligence, is quite blurred. cia guy, you run the pentagon. pentagon guy, you run the military. what's the difference? unanimous decision. really big story here, though. the really big gap between the noncontroversy in washington, the lack of political debate about this big picture here, and how unpopular that big picture is in the rest of the country. the hill newspaper released a poll last week showing 72% of the american people think we are involved in too many foreign conflicts overseas, and americans favor removing the u.s. military from afghanistan. 66% of americans oppose the war in iraq. and the public in large part opposes military intervention in libya as well. and in that sort of environment, we confirmed a new cia director and new leader of pentagon with zero did i sent. not to say that these guys personally embody the problem, but where's the debate on this problem? a
was in afghanistan, part of the rugged mountainous region near the border with pakistan that's perfect for hiding out in. sergeant petry's unit was assigned to make a risky daylight raid on a compound why u.s. intelligence said a top al qaeda commander was hiding. the moment the helicopter landed they came under fire. within minutes as they moved into a court yard in the compound a machine gun round went through both of his legs. he was bleedly badly. he nevertheless aided another wounded soldier leaving him to take cover behind a chicken coop in the courtyard. he did this with severe injuries to both of his legs. sergeant petry launched a grenade in the direction of the enemy fighters, who were shooting at the rangers. that provided enough cover for a third ranger to join them behind the chicken coop to evaluate the wounds. an enemy grenade exploded in the courtyard. it further hurt the ranger that he was helping and the third ranger. a second grenade thrown by the energy fighters landed next to the three wounded rangers. it had not exploded yet. sergeant petry dressed his own wound at the time. his
headlines later today. 11:00 eastern former pakistan president pervez musharraf gives a speech. >>> at noon the crew of space shuttle "atlantis" will hold a news conference to talk about their final mission. "atlantis" landed at kennedy space center around 6:00 this morning ending the 30-year program. >>> house republicans are call ing to push the cut cap balance bill. a news conference at 12:45 eastern. >>> let's go ahead and check in first with kate bolduan in washington. kate? >> lawmakers and the white house are all watching the clock, still looking for a way out of this debt ceiling crisis we find ourselves in still today. how will they break the log jam in or at the top of the hour. >>> also coming up in the next hour, a minnesota community divided by a school district's curriculum policy on sexual orientation. now a federal investigation and also the threat of a lawsuit that is pending by two civil rights groups. we're going to have that full story coming up in the next hour. >>> and i'm david mattingly in atlanta. will the nfl sign a labor agreement? there is a lot of hope going aro
. >> the job is most certainly not done. al qaeda operatives still plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground. still intimidate and still assassinate. >> these attacks on karzai's inner circle are, we're told, likely to get worse as u.s. troops again coming home and through the transition in 2014, shepard. >> shepard: jennifer, thank you. there is word of enough signs two al qaeda groups may be joining forces. u.s. officials are now saying the branch in yemen has given weapons, fighters, beings explosives and training to the affiliate in somalia. yes, ma'am mental and somalia coming together against us. the officials say this is especially dangerous because both groups have recruited u.s. citizens. remember that radical american cleric anwar al awlaki is the leader of al qaeda in yemen. the feds have linked him to recent terror plots against the united states. including the attempted christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, de
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
persecuted because they are christians, whether it be in afghanistan, whether it be in pakistan or in the egypt and all over, the two questions that i have. how many convictions have there been over the last several years? and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? because generally been there is a problem for the members go to the and become the advocate for how many convictions do you know have been cases brought in the egyptian courts and how many times has the american embassy participated and been involved in any different case? >> thank you very much, mr. wolfe. there has been in the 50 cases of i was involved with personally, there were two investigations. meter investigation resulted in any legal process. so there are no convictions resulting as the complaints to the effect of kidnapping forced marriages and forced conversions of coptic christian women. to my knowledge also and according to my research, the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one nice thing, mr. chairman, as you have the record i u
and talked about, we're not worried about the al qaeda in pakistan because of the death of bin laden though we can't write off ayman al-zawahiri, the new leader of al qaeda in the pakistani tribal areas but he's worried about yemen and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and also, somalia, across the waterways there where you have al-shabab. so, al qaeda has been morphing for quite some time, since 9/11 and i think he's saying the threats are moving in that direction and that he thinks and the administration believes that al qaeda, the one we think of from 9/11 purposes, usama bin laden and ayman al-zawahiri, may be on its death bed. alisyn: and how, in this new 2.0 version, how much of a threat is anwar al-awlaki. >> he's dangerous, he was here in the u.s. on 9/11 and left the u.s. and went to yemen and, is responsible probably for at least three major attacks or plots in the u.s., including the detroit under wear bombing. including the fort hood assaults, attacks and the ink cartridge capers, where they tried to modify ink printer cartridges as bombs and is considered probably the most dang
to al qaeda, damaging their network. they're said to be mostly across the border, and pakistan is again a concern back where they started. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold, high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban. they're getting gutsy. right past there are usually patrols. if you push it far past that, you're going to take enemy contact it's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait for them ahead. [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, times from lone gunmen up high, who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network made america's case for invading, slipping back in just when america makes its case to leave. nick paton walsh. >>> we're going to find out what's next for anthony after she was sentenced this morning for lying to police. well-being. we're all striving for it
blasts around the world. but those ied blasts, especially in afghanistan and in pakistan may groove to be critical, because again, a bomb maker leaves a signature. most bomb makers continue to make their bombs the same way until they are either killed or caught. so they're going to look to see if this matches any of the information that may be in that very classified u.s. database on bomb makers around the world. wolf? >> when you get more information, let us know, barbara, thank very much. and to our viewer, stand by for all breaking news on the deadly attacks in norway. we're not leaving the story for long. we're watching president obama, trying to pull voters into the debt limit drama as the clock winds down. we're taking a closer look at where the talks stand right now. and the long distance message he's sending republicans. and the people turn against a powerful and feared state legislature who pushed for the toughest immigration laws the nation has ever seen. stay with us. the chevy cruze eco offers an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
'll remember that a lot of documents were taken from osama bin laden's compound in pakistan. well, apparently, we're learning what those documents showed. and the information that we're getting now is that u.s. president barack obama and general david petraeus were actually specifically mentioned as targets for al qaeda in these documents and that the mode of attack was even talked about. it involved destroying their aircraft when they were in the region. now, this is a source that's familiar with these materials that were recovered from the compound. they are telling us now what these documents said. once again, when the navy s.e.a.l.s stormed that compound that you're looking at right now back on may 2nd with the hopes of taking out osama bin laden, the most wanted terrorist on the fbi's most wanted list, when they took those documents, retrieved those documents and those computers, documents now saying that general david petraeus and president barack obama were both targets of al qaeda. going into detail about when they were going to be in the region, how they were going to target their ai
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women from britain was given their lives in the fight against terrorism across the world. we should pay tribute especially to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was the man who is responsible for 9/11, which was not only an horrific killing of americans, but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as that of the family group for united airlines flight 93 put it, we erased obviously never to hope for some and that. we are willing to make the section in this case. our world is a better place without him. >> of understanding satisfaction of those who lost family members in the inferno of 9/11
interference. we have laws to be obeyed. >> unless it comes from the pakistan isi. >> thank you for this example. >> we have money going to the ngo's who have rejected it. >> registered. >> according to our laws. we have an organization here in the united states helping egypt to manage elections. we're giving some money to the justice and interior ministers. they are welcomed. mr. sweeney is all over egypt. it is a matter of sovereignty, to have some money from abroad [unintelligible] not egypt only can accept that. >> i would ask two more questions and then we will turn it over to steve. you mentioned that you and your colleagues are ready to go back to your professional jobs as military men. eager. >> that is correct. >> since 1952 the egyptian military has played a fairly prominent role in egyptian life. you cannot say that it has only played a military role but it has played a military and political role since 1952. and right now you're playing one of your most important roles in your history. if the project works, new parliament, new president, and we are on a new track tow
the pakistan isi. >> we have money going to the ngo's whichever rejected it. we have an organization here in the united states helping egypt to manage elections. thee giving some money to justice and interior ministers. it is a matter of sovereignty, to have some money from abroad [unintelligible] not egypt only can accept that. >> i would ask two more questions and then we will turn it over to steve. you mentioned that you and your colleagues are ready to go back to your professional jobs as military men. eager. >> that is correct. >> since 1952 the egyptian military has played a fairly prominent role in egyptian life. you cannot say that it has only played a military role but it has played in military and political role since 1952. and right now you're playing one of your most important roles in your history. if the project works committee parliament company president, and we are on a new track toward democratic egypt, which many of us here very much hope will happen, what kind of role will the military still play? there are two models that i have in mind. one is turkey in the 1980's, t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)